Intangible Assets: Who Gets Custody of your Friends after your Divorce?

The Sampair Group offers divorce and family law support. Most divorces create an emotionally draining time in life, and The Sampair Group helps take of the pressure by helping with the legal decisions. Here are some tips as to what happens with the intangible assets like seperating friends in the divorce process.

By Christina Pesoli

When it comes to divorce, it’s not just the couple that goes in separate directions. Everything gets divided up. From investments, debt, furniture, family photos, pets and even time with the kids, what once was “ours” gets reclassified as “yours” and “mine.”

The details of the division are then memorialized in the divorce documents. He gets the NASCAR memorabilia; you get the Scentsy distributorship. He gets the dog; you get the cat. He gets the kids the first and third weekend of the month; you get them the second and fourth. You may not like either the exercise or the outcome, but you at least understand that it’s part of the drill.

But there is one group of assets that is entirely left out of the formal divorce process: your friends. Because friends are a primary source of comfort and support, and further because there’s nothing like a divorce to make you need heaping helpings of both, how this very valuable group of assets gets divvied up can have a big impact on how easily you bounce back.

In a perfect world, friends wouldn’t have to take sides in the wake of a divorce. (And adorable elves really would bake delicious cookies in tree trunk bakeries!) But we don’t live in a perfect world; we live in the real world.

And here’s another bummer: While you don’t have much say over which friends you get to keep after your divorce, you do have the power to drive friends away. Just try launching a campaign to convince them how terrible your ex is and see how fast your cell phone stops ringing.

You see, it’s up to your friends to decide who they’ll stay close to after your split. They know both of you and they’ll make the decision that’s best for them. And that’s okay. Although it might be really hard to appreciate this right now, both of you need support to get through the process. And that goes double if you have kids. So resist the urge to lobby and just relax and let your friends figure things out for themselves.

To read more click here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/christina-pesoli/intangible-friendships-wh_b_1901839.html