Making the Most Out of Supervised Visitation (Part 1)

child custody attorney ArizonaUnder certain circumstances, a non-custodial parent will receive visitation and parenting time with their child, but often this visitation is supervised under court order. Common reasons for supervised visits include fear of potential abuse, or to monitor the supervision if there has been a long gap since the parent and child have seen each other.

For many involved in the situation of supervised mediation, it can be constraining. But if you are a non-custodial parent with supervised visitation with your child, there are ways you can make the most of it.

In supervised visitation, someone is present during all of your visiting hours with your child. While this may seem restricting and uncomfortable at times, it means that someone is there to testify your good parenting skills and the bond you are forming with the children. These testimonials could show the court that you are not a danger to your children to establish your credibility in court.

One of the ways you can improve the outcomes of your parenting time is to be 15-20 minutes early for every visit. This proves that you have made your child a priority in your life and want to spend the maximum time available with your children. If transportation is an issue with getting to your visits, make sure you schedule all of this way ahead of time to be prepared.

Just as important as showing up early is attending every single visit. Sometimes, life happens and it may be impossible for you to attend a visitation. But don’t miss too many, as it looks bad on your part. Attending every visit shows that the child is your priority.

Use your visitations to correct any bad behaviors that may be presumed of your from the court’s concerns. If the court felt that alcohol abuse was a concern, show up sober and well-kept to every visitation. If you are taking prescription medication, make sure the supervisor is aware of this. If your temper was a concern during your child custody discussions with the court, keep your calm and do not get a temper with your children, the supervisor or the other parent.

Continued in Part 2