Tips for Successful Divorce Mediation Part 2

MediationContinued from Part 1

Don’t “Take Back” Negotiations
Once you and your spouse agree on specific terms, do not try and renegotiate or “take it back” if your spouse ends up not agreeing on a new issue that follows. Once you have each agreed on a negotiation, consider it done and move forward with other discussions.

Work On The Easy Issues First
Instead of tackling the big issues that may be more difficult to mediate, work on the easy issues first. For example, if you know you’re going to allow your spouse to share custody, settle custody and visitation issues first. Working on issues that both of you can likely agree on will allow you to learn how to work willingly with each other.

Get Used To Compromise
Compromise is a key element of mediation, and successful compromise will make the process much easier. In the end, compromising allows both parties to gain more out of the situation. Both of you should keep an open mind and consider various solutions to many situations instead of just focusing on getting your way every single time, which is an unrealistic expectation.

Speak Your Mind
Don’t hesitate to speak up if you need some time to consider your options before agreeing to or making a big decision. Keep a mental count of how many times you receive your most ideal outcome so you can be ready to compromise on issues you can settle with, but if you feel things aren’t necessarily going in your favor at least some small portion of the time, speak up in a civil way and express your concern. The goal is to be sure that everyone leaves feeling heard and feeling like they have reached an agreement that is fair and equitable. Be careful to keep in mind that this process is not about who wins or who loses, but mostly about compromise. Focus on moving forward with fairness and integrity.

For more information on the experience of a divorce mediation and how to keep yourself legally protected through divorce litigation, contact an experience Glendale divorce lawyerat The Sampair Group today.
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