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Homeschooling and Child Custody

Homeschooling has become more and more popular in recent years. Some parents choose this option for religious reasons, others because they simply believe their child will be better served by education at home. Homeschooling can become an issue in a custody case in several situations. When a parenting plan is being created, the plan has to work with the schooling schedule. Sometimes one parent opposes homeschooling and would prefer a child attend public or private schools and will not consent to homeschooling.

In Arizona, the parent with legal decision-making authority makes the decision about how and where the child will be educated. If legal decision-making is being decided by the court and the parents have differing views on schooling, this may play a part in the decision the court makes. The custody decision is made based on what is in the child’s best interests. One of the factors considered by the court in this analysis is the child’s adjustment to school. If a child is currently homeschooled, the court will examine how the child is doing and if remaining in homeschooling would benefit the child. If the child is currently in a traditional school, the court will again examine the child’s progress and determine if remaining in the school or switching to homeschooling is best.

Homeschooling is legal and is considered an appropriate education as long as the parent providing the education meets the standards and requirements set by the state. In the past, homeschooling may have been a negative factor, but today it is considered acceptable.

If you are involved in a custody battle involving homeschooling, gather records and evidence that demonstrate your child’s progress (or lack of progress) in the current schooling environment. If your child was previously involved in a different kind of schooling, evidence of how well your child fared in that environment will provide needed contrast.

Call the Sampair Group for advice in your custody case in the Glendale, Mesa, and Phoenix areas of Arizona. We are ready to help you with your case.

Custody and Your Child’s School

When you’re going through a custody case, you instinct may be to try to keep it quiet for as long as possible, in order to protect your child. It is a lot to deal with and if suddenly everyone your child knows is aware of it, it can be overwhelming. Although you might not be ready to tell the world, it is important to communicate with your child’s school about what is happening.

Because of the situation at home, your child’s behavior at school may be impacted. It’s a good idea to communicate with your child’s teacher so she is prepared to help your child should emotions surface at school. Children react in many different ways and your child’s teacher could be puzzled by a sudden behavior change if she doesn’t know what’s happening inside your family. It is also possible that your child may decide to open up to the teacher about the situation, so you want her to be in the loop. The school may also have resources for children going through divorce, such as counseling or support groups. Peer group meetings can be of invaluable help for your child so he can see that other kids are coping with the same issues.

Once you have a temporary or permanent order of custody, you will want to give a copy to the school, particularly if you want restrictions placed on whether your ex can pick your child up or take him out of school. They need to know who is the custodial parent and who has decision-making authority. If the non-custodial parents wants to stay informed with copies of notices, report cards, and parent-teacher conferences, the school may need a copy of the order to provide these as well.

When you need an attorney who will stand up for you, call the Sampair Group in Scottsdale, Paradise Valley and Glendale. We’re ready to take your call.

How to Survive a Custody Battle

If you’re involved in a custody case that’s ugly or about to get ugly, it’s one of the most challenging things you will ever face. You will get through this though! Keep these tips in mind to keep your sanity.

  • Keep your kids out of it. As hard as it is to keep them uninvolved, it’s important. Hearing parents say negative things about each other is only going to hurt your child.
  • Keep a journal. A journal will help you not only track when parenting time is being exercised by you and your ex, but it also allows you to detail your involvement in your child’s life. This could be useful at your trial.
  • Find a way to blow off steam. You need an outlet for your emotions because there are going to be days when you’re going to feel very frustrated. Plan regular exercise, time with friends, and fun things to keep your head together through the tough times.
  • Try to find a settlement. Because custody trials are painful, work with your attorney or mediator to try to find a solution before you have to go to a trial.
  • Limit contact with your ex. Keep it all business – transferring your child and handling finances. Try to avoid confrontations and outbursts. They aren’t going to help since your situation is being decided in the legal arena, not in any blow up you might have with each other.
  • Stick to your temporary orders. Even if you think your temporary custody order is unfair, stick to it to show the judge you are reliable and law-abiding.
  • Don’t listen to well-meaning advice. Only you and your attorney know all the facts about your case. Friends and family may try to tell you what to do, but ultimately the case needs to be decided according to the law.

The Sampair Group is your choice for family law cases in Maricopa County. Call us for an appointment with one of our knowledgeable attorneys now.

Celebrating Your Child’s Birthday After Divorce

Your child’s birthday is a day that is important to you, your child, and your ex. Deciding how to share time for your child’s birthday can be done as part of your parenting plan, or it can be something you work out in the future. It is often best to negotiate the birthday when you are working out holiday schedules. There are a lot of options to consider.

You and the other parent could alternate years for your child’s birthday. This would mean that one of you would not see your child on the actual birthday each year.  You and the other parent could also share the day, splitting it in half. It is also possible to share the day, or some of the day, together as a family. If one of you will not see your child on the birthday, you can bridge the physical gap with Skype or phone calls, saving cards and presents for when you can be together in person to celebrate.

How you spend time on your child’s birthday will change as he grows. Children who are elementary aged often have separate parties for friends and for relatives. You may decide that you both want to be present for the friends party. It is common for parents to have separate family parties so members of their own families can celebrate the birthday. Teens may be more interested in when they can be with their friends than when they can be with their parents for their birthdays.

Another issue to consider when it comes to birthdays are expenses. If you are having a child’s party at a venue, you might consider sharing the cost of the party with each other. Some parents give gifts together on birthdays or coordinate with each other to avoid duplicate gifts.

Call the Sampair Group for advice about your divorce or family law in the Glendale, Mesa, and Phoenix areas of Arizona. Our attorneys offer compassionate and careful advice. Call us today.

Questions Your Child May Ask About Divorce

Although divorce is an accepted part of our culture and is something children are very aware of, when divorce happens in your family, your child is likely to have many questions for you. Anticipating these questions can help you be prepared to answer them.

  • Where am I going to live? This may be your child’s first question because children first want to know exactly how the divorce will affect their own lives and routines. Your child needs to understand what to expect in his daily life – is anything going to change, and if so, what. Answering this question allows your child to feel grounded and secure and he will then be able to move on and process the situation and come up with other questions.
  • Was it my fault? Although your child may not actually put this question into words, it is one almost every child will worry about. Be sure to address this unasked question when you talk about the divorce. It is essential your child know that he did nothing wrong and did not cause the divorce.
  • Why are you mad at each other? What your child really wants to know is why are you getting a divorce and what caused it. While the reasons behind your divorce are likely complex, it is best to come up with an answer to this question that you and your spouse can agree on and stick to, such as we aren’t happy being married to each other or we don’t love each other anymore.
  • Why can’t you get back together and try again? Many children simply want their parents to reunite and live together again no matter how impossible this may be. Tell your child you have tried and have made the grown up decision that this is what is best.

Many parents find that visiting a therapist can help a child work through these questions and also help the parents answer them completely and carefully

Call the Sampair Group to discuss your child custody case. We are located in Maricopa County, Arizona and are ready to work with you. Make an appointment today.

Can Divorce Be Good for Your Child?

You’ve probably read a lot of the media coverage about the impact of divorce on children, which focuses on all the ways divorce can harm children. Instead of focusing on this, there are definitely ways in which divorce can improve your child’s life that you can think about.

  • No fighting.  When you get a divorce, your child will live in a home without marital conflict. Parents who stay together for the sake of the children exude a lot of tension and negative emotions. When you divorce, you end all of that for your child on a day-to-day basis, providing him with two homes in which there is no more fighting. This improves your child’s life immensely.
  • Emphasis on happiness. When you decide to get a divorce, you are deciding that your happiness matters. This is a wonderful example to set for your child. You are showing your child that happiness is a priority for you and should be for her.
  • Tough decisions can be made. The choices you make in a divorce are challenging, but they help you prioritize and focus on what you need. Your child learns that everyone faces tough choices and it’s possible to work through them with determination and time.
  • Compromise works.  When you settle your divorce or custody case, you not only reduce the conflict in your child’s life, but you also demonstrate that compromise is the best way to end a disagreement. This is an important lesson for your child to learn.
  • Grit gets you through. Getting through your divorce is hard, there’s no question. The fact that you are getting through it and are still managing to parent and do the important things in life shows your child that it’s possible to get through tough times, even times that challenge every sector of your life.

The Sampair Group is your divorce firm in Maricopa County. Your case matters to us and we are here to help you. Call our office today for an appointment.

3 Benefits of Co-Parenting You May Not Be Aware Of

When you are working through a divorce or custody case, setting up a parenting plan can take a lot of time and effort. Often it is one of the most emotionally challenging aspects of the case. Many parents are able to come to an agreement about co-parenting and those who cannot are provided with orders from the court to follow. You are probably aware that co-parenting is usually considered to be the most beneficial plan possible for your family. No matter how your parenting plan comes into being, it has some benefits you may not have thought about.

  1. It teaches your child independence. While you may be worried about your child adjusting to two homes and a shared parenting schedule, the truth is that as challenging as the initial adjustment may be, the entire experience builds independence and confidence. Your child has to learn to plan and pack for the transitions. He or she also has to learn to be comfortable and confident in different environments.
  2. You get enforced free time. There isn’t a parent on the planet who has not dreamt about a day free of child care obligations. Of course you will miss your child when you are apart, but you now have time to yourself that is going to be a regular part of your schedule.
  3. Your children see the importance of conflict resolution skills. When you and your ex are able to work through your problems with each other to create a parenting schedule, attend events together, and create a united parenting front, no matter how flawed or imperfect, your children learn that it is possible to work through conflict and find common ground.

When you are going through a divorce or custody case, you have a lot of questions.  Call the Sampair Group today for help in Mesa, Glendale, and Phoenix today to discuss your case with one of our attorneys.

What To Do When Your Child Divorces

If you are the parent of an adult who is getting a divorce, you want to be there to help your child through this difficult time. It can be challenging to know what to do or what not to do when thrown into this role.

–          Take sides. While you may have a good relationship with your son-in-law or daughter-in-law, this is a time when family comes first. Your child needs to know you support him and that you are on his side. Be loyal. This doesn’t mean you won’t be able to be friendly with the in-law in the future, but for now, stay loyal.

–          Help financially if possible. Your child may need financial assistance to pay for the legal fees and may also need a helping hand when it comes to finding a place to live or being able to afford to live alone after the divorce. If you have the resources, financial help can be invaluable at this time.

–          Be a rock for your grandchildren. Make yourself available for babysitting, for overnights, for fun excursions, for homework help and just as a loving presence for your grandchildren. This is a difficult time for them and a solid grandparent relationship can help a lot. It will also help your child to know you are there for your grandchildren.

–          Bite your tongue. While you may have strong opinions about what your child is doing or plans on doing, don’t say too much. Well-placed advice can be useful when it is asked for. But parental advice can sound a lot like criticism at this very challenging time in your child’s life.

 The Sampair Group provides divorce representation in Maricopa County, Arizona. Our attorneys offer years of experience and a welcoming attitude. Contact us today for an appointment.

Questions You Child May Ask About Divorce

Although divorce is an accepted part of our culture and is something children are very aware of, when divorce happens in your family, your child is likely to have many questions for you. Anticipating these questions can help you be prepared to answer them.

  1. Where am I going to live? This may be your child’s first question because children first want to know exactly how the divorce will affect their own lives and routines. Your child needs to understand what to expect in his daily life – is anything going to change, and if so, what. Answering this question allows your child to feel grounded and secure and he will then be able to move on and process the situation and come up with other questions.
  2. Was it my fault? Although your child may not actually put this question into words, it is one almost every child will worry about. Be sure to address this unasked question when you talk about the divorce. It is essential your child know that he did nothing wrong and did not cause the divorce.
  3. 3.       Why are you mad at each other? What your child really wants to know is why are you getting a divorce and what caused it. While the reasons behind your divorce are likely complex, it is best to come up with an answer to this question that you and your spouse can agree on and stick to, such as we aren’t happy being married to each other or we don’t love each other anymore.
  4. 4.       Why can’t you get back together and try again? Many children simply want their parents to reunite and live together again no matter how impossible this may be. Tell your child you have tried and have made the grown up decision that this is what is best.

Many parents find that visiting a therapist can help a child work through these questions and also help the parents answer them completely and carefully.

Call the Sampair Group to discuss your child custody case. We are located in Maricopa County, Arizona and are ready to work with you. Make an appointment today.

 

 

What To Do When Your Child Divorces

If you are the parent of an adult who is getting a divorce, you want to be there to help your child through this difficult time. It can be challenging to know what to do or what not to do when thrown into this role.
Take sides. While you may have a good relationship with your son-in-law or daughter-in-law, this is a time when family comes first. Your child needs to know you support him and that you are on his side. Be loyal. This doesn’t mean you won’t be able to be friendly with the in-law in the future, but for now, stay loyal.
Help financially if possible. Your child may need financial assistance to pay for the legal fees and may also need a helping hand when it comes to finding a place to live or being able to afford to live alone after the divorce. If you have the resources, financial help can be invaluable at this time.
Be a rock for your grandchildren. Make yourself available for babysitting, for overnights, for fun excursions, for homework help and just as a loving presence for your grandchildren. This is a difficult time for them and a solid grandparent relationship can help a lot. It will also help your child to know you are there for your grandchildren.
Bite your tongue. While you may have strong opinions about what your child is doing or plans on doing, don’t say too much. Well-placed advice can be useful when it is asked for. But parental advice can sound a lot like criticism at this very challenging time in your child’s life.

The Sampair Group provides divorce representation in Maricopa County, Arizona. Our attorneys offer years of experience and a welcoming attitude. Contact us today for an appointment.